First Timer trip help...please and thank you

Discussion in 'Trip Planning and Travel Concerns' started by Martie K, May 7, 2022.

  1. Martie K

    Martie K
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    Hello Members,

    I am a first time travel trailer owner. I am very excited but also very nervous as my first trip is a long ways. From Largo Florida to Buffalo NY. I am giving myself 4 days but do not want to drive for the first time through the mountains.

    Everyone has to start somewhere, somehow and I was hoping through membership (Good Sam, KOA) there was some sort of concierge service like a AAA Trip Tik to assist me with this. I have not found one, but did get this app and am praying someone or someones can help me plan.

    I hope to meet and enjoy as many new friends and places as I possibly can since this is a real dream of mine. After some future practice i'll brace the mountains, just not my first trip.

    Thanks and Sincerest APpreciation for all assistance.
     
  2. weighit

    weighit
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    Hope I can give some help to you. Looking at the map i have it is about 1,300 miles drive and that would be about 325 miles per day. I live in Azrizona and we have some mountains, but the trip your planning won't have anywhere near the evevation rise or drop we do. Since this is your first driving trip maybe if possible to extend the drive days to 5 or 6 and go not quite as far each day to remove some of the worry? Wishing you a safe trip and let us know how you did.
     
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  3. Martie K

    Martie K
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    Unfortunately the max time I could extend would be on my final day into Buffalo arriving late in evening. The trip itself doesn't scare me, its the mountains...Im just not ready for those yet. Thank you so much for replying :)
     
  4. Fitzjohnfan

    Fitzjohnfan
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    You didn't let us know the size of your tow vehicle and trailer, so i am hoping you have the appropriate vehicle for the size of the trailer.
    Assuming that, the next biggest concern is keeping your brakes coolon the downhill portions. Be sure to gear down and let the engine and tranny slow you down.

    The RV lifestyle is a slower pace than taking regular road trips. You want to have time in the evening to set up camp, make dinner, relax, and maybe take a stroll around the RV park. It also helps to arrive at the RV park before dark, to have enough light to find your site and set up camp.
     
  5. Rollin Ollens

    Rollin Ollens
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    Great advice on keeping the brakes cool Chris. That is so important since an overheated braking system will probably fail when you need it most. The same goes for the cooling system. Using a lower gear to climb and not overwork the engine helps a lot. It will take a bit longer to get to the top but less time than it will take to cool your engine sitting on the side of the road. Most times that we drive the Coquihalla highway (British Columbia route 5) we see someone pulled off from overheating. There are two long steep grades both directions.

    Take your time, smell the roses and get to your destination safe.

    Darrell
     
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  6. BankShot

    BankShot
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    Hi Martie and welcome to the forum. What weighit, Chris, and Darrell have said all makes really good sense, especially involving the brakes and pacing yourself where you are able to. Driving for extended periods of time is not good as you are in control of not only your tow vehicle but also that big box on wheels you have behind you. Don't be too afraid of mountain driving as common sense will tell you to just slow down, gear down wherever needed, and take any tight turns as slow as you feel comfortable with. Also be sure to start slowing down a few hundred yards or more before you do enter a tight turn or a blind curve you see ahead. Don't be concerned with the few vehicles that you might encounter behind you as you can always pull over and let them pass at the turnouts that are usually spaced a few miles apart on most all mountain roads. Another thing we do when on grades is put our flashers on so let other drivers know we are a "slow mover". As Chris also mentioned it would be helpful if you would let us know the size of your trailer and what you will be towing it with. One other important point is to make sure your hitch is correctly hooked up before you take off. If you aren't certain what is the proper hookup then take it into an RV dealer and let them show you how to do so. Well worth the extra time to make sure everything is correct. Again, welcome to the forum and even tho you will be nervous at first once you get the "feel" for your setup and how it handles, etc. things will just fall into place for you. We are all here to assist with anything we can, just jump in and ask whatever questions you have. Someone will for sure be there for you................

    Travel safely, BankShot..............(aka Terry)
     
  7. Martie K

    Martie K
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    Thank you all :).... weight is 7298 and length is 32 ft. Truck very capable as we started small"ish" so we wernt taxing the engine...lol and to give us time to decide and pratice. Also my uncle has decided to join us on our first venture for added assistance...he has experience hauling his boat.

    We are excited and looking forward to making memories and friends
     
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  8. Fitzjohnfan

    Fitzjohnfan
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    I like Bankshots comments about taking mountain curves in an RV (as well as his other suggestions). When you see those orange or yellow signs indicating a suggested speed for a curve or set of curves, in a car, you can generally go 5-10 mph faster than suggested, but in an RV, these should be taken as gospel.
    The times I take curves too fast, i get the look from my copilot that i try very hard avoid!
     
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  9. Rollin Ollens

    Rollin Ollens
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    And on that note: This did not happen to me but I know of an occurrence in British Columbia.

    An excerpt from "Drive Smart BC" : https://www.drivesmartbc.ca/signs-signals/regulatory-and-advisory-signs

    "An advisory sign gives advance notice of conditions on or adjacent to a highway that are potentially hazardous to traffic. A driver may choose whether or not to follow the suggestion given by the sign. Ignoring the advice is not an offence in itself, but anything that happens because the signs are not given consideration may be an offence.

    A common advisory sign is the large diamond shaped sign shows a black arrow on a yellow background telling drivers of a curve ahead. Underneath it is a smaller square sign with black lettering on a yellow background showing a speed of 30 km/h."

    So, buddy lost control rounding a corner too fast causing a collision thus faced a number of charges one of which was speeding. It was contested and the driver lost the battle. And the big deal was all about the increase in the driver's future insurance premiums. His fine plus the demerits for speeding raised the premium substantially. I'm not sure how this would play out in other provinces or states, but it's still food for thought.

    Darrell
     
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  10. Jo Hab

    Jo Hab
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    I do understand you. I remember my first long trip in an RV with my wife. We had over 3,000 miles of the drive. We were traveling to ride bikes in Marin country in California. The biggest problem was how to transport our bikes.
     
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