Special License For Rv Drivers

Discussion in 'General Community Discussions' started by fpullanosr, May 5, 2013.

  1. docj

    docj
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    Rich:

    I'm sure you are well aware that the 26,000 lb cut-off simply reflects the federal CDL requirement. Any cut-off is, by nature, arbitrary, but unless you are advocating that 18-wheelers be driven without any license requirement, some cut-off is needed. I agree that the crazy quilt of state requirements is ridiculous. My wife doesn't need a higher license level because we are SD residents; if she lived in TX she would need it. But the federal government lets states set licensing requirement; as you well know, even the CDL is a federal requirement that the states administer. Trying to enforce federal rules on RV licenses would result in a huge backlash.

    Since RV licensing requirements in most states mirror the CDL requirements, are you saying that that the CDL requirements are BS? Sure, most RVers will never parallel park their MH's, but don't you agree that the skills required to do an offset backing maneuver are very similar to those required for backing into an RV site? How many RVers do you know who have to have pull-throughs because they can't back into a site? I agree that the CDL "walk around" is a bit much for RVers, but maybe it's not such a bad idea that RVers know something about how the vehicles they drive actually operate.

    In summary, I agree that the current system is nonsensical but I strongly believe that additional training should be required for operators of heavy vehicles. You can design whatever training and tests you think are appropriate but I think it is absurd for a driver to step from a 3,000 car into a 45,000 MH without any additional training.

    Joel
     
  2. docj

    docj
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    I'm not sure what you mean about a license that has to be continually renewed. None of the "higher level" licenses that I am aware of, including the CDL, require anything additional for renewal other than the usual eye test and payment of fees.

    In South Dakota this spring I renewed my Class B CDL with just that, a simple "look through the machine" eye test and payment of ~$50. No driving test was required, nor is it required for renewal of the Texas non-commercial Class B license required of drivers of larger motorhomes. If you've been led to believe otherwise, it is incorrect.

    To my knowledge, none of the non-commercial RV drivers license requirements require DOT medical cards which is the only ongoing aspect of the CDL that might seem burdensome to RVers. But even that requirement can be "self-certified" in many states by which a driver can attest to the fact that he is not engaged in driving for which a DOT card would be required. Since I don't currently drive commercially I file such an affidavit with the DPS of the State of South Dakota.

    Joel
     
  3. RLM

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    That is why the Class B is basically a tax revenue. There is no training required before taking the paper test. There should be.

    I've been riding motorcycles for 25 years, but I still had to take the two day course to be able to then take the written. No complaints from me. It was good training even for an experienced rider.

    BTW, if one drives the MH to the testing place for the road test without first having the license, they would be violating the law. A gotcha.
     
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  4. BankShot

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    [QUOTE="RLM, post: 50787]
    BTW, if one drives the MH to the testing place for the road test without first having the license, they would be violating the law. A gotcha.[/QUOTE]

    So this prompts the question, "What does one do to pass the road test without physically driving his MH to the testing facility" I am not aware of any places that provide a Class A or other RVs to take a test in. Sounds like a real oxy-moron situation to me. I guess one would have to find a friend with the right license to drive it in for you........... :rolleyes:

    Regards, BankShot..............(aka Terry)
     
    #64 BankShot, Nov 4, 2016
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 4, 2016
  5. RLM

    RLM
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    It is no different than driving a teenager to get their first license. Someone with a valid license has to do it.
     
  6. dbnck

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    Yes. Part of the course of study for a barber license has to do with sanitation and infection, and those issues are part of the ongoing inspections.


    That's a pretty common belief, but I asked a friend of mine who's been doing personal injury law for 35 years. He's never handled an RV case, but said that lack of the required Class B license could be some evidence that the driver was not properly trained, but that's all.
     
  7. Monica998

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    I think I can understand, because some of the RVs' body are huge, which need the people have the proficient driving skills for the safety consideration.
     

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